7/31: Rules pamphlets located

The saga is over! An official pamphlet of the MTA Rules of Conduct can be obtained in Brooklyn at 29 Gallatin Place, 3rd floor, on the rack outside the elevator.  (This is, I’m told, the same place one goes to contest a summons).

By the way, you can take as many as you’d like. That’s precisely what I did:

Rules of Conduct
I’ll be delivering these while making the rounds, so that we don’t each have to hike out to Brooklyn. (Speaking of which, I gave out the first two t-shirts today. Find me soon to get yours!)

 

 

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7/29: How to sue for a wrongful summons

Update at 7:30 PM: I spoke with Paul Hale of Hale Legal Group this afternoon, and he said he’d be more than willing to take on summons cases for the performing community. I think we’ve found our guy.

I emailed back and forth recently with a prominent arts advocate. He had big news: if you receive a wrongful summons, you can go ahead and sue for it.

I followed up on this with Galluzzo & Johnson, and it was confirmed that a wrongful summons is potentially an easy target for a lawsuit. (Remember — even if your officer was polite, and even if he or she mentioned pretexts like blocking traffic, your summons was still wrongful if you weren’t clearly breaking a law).

Your first step after getting a summons should be to get it dismissed at the adjudication. I haven’t done this personally, but it’s said to be easily done. We’re hoping to observe the process and post tips soon. (You can also talk to a lawyer at any point for a consultation, although you can’t typically sign the retainer agreement to start a suit until after your charges have been dropped or you’ve received an ACD.)

After that, you can go ahead and get going with a lawyer. Alternatively, you can even file a notice of claim yourself with this form, and the city may settle without you needing a lawyer. (I suspect it’d best to work with someone for now, at least until we know the ropes better).

Last item: if you contact us, we can send additional information privately, cheer for you during the process, and potentially even help your attorney document other cases of harassment to support you. Let’s get this show on the road!